Since you were all so great and vocal about the snowflake problem from last week, I though I would canvas your opinions again.  If you were to be going to a workshop/class which was to last 2-3 hours, which of the following would you rather do?  Please note that the examples are not in any way exhaustive, just what I could think of to illustrate the point!

1. Do a complete project in the class where you're really learning just one technique so that you are able to complete the entire thing in the class, for example a table runner with a simple pattern or a frame purse or zippy pouch

2. Learn a series of techniques, where you have hands on practice on each one, but where you only have your samples to walk away with at the end rather than an entire project, for example a variety of quilting techniques on individual squares, or a variety of bag making techniques on small pieces of fabric to illustrate the technique in question

3. Do a more complex project in the class where you have been sent prep to do beforehand by way of cutting out pattern pieces etc, but are able to more or less complete in the class, for example a mini quilt with 4 different sample type blocks, or a bag with adjustable straps and several different types of pocket

4. Other - tell me what you'd like to do by way of classes (please note I'm not looking for suggestions of actual projects, just the style of learning)

I shall reveal why I've been asking later this month...

38 comments:

  1. Oooh, are you going to be teaching?? I think I would either prefer a complete project in the class or one where I do a bit of prep at home and finish during the class.

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  2. Definitely THREE
    You can do the easy things at home
    You can finish it at home
    And really LEARN something in class: get help from your teacher on something you would not 've mastered all by yourself.
    A teacher should give you that extra push, extra explanation, extra illumination, extra instruction so you can actually do something after the class which you couldn't do before.
    Well, that's my opinion.
    (I hope I did that in class, but perhaps it's a bit harder teaching at secondary schools)

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  3. Interestingly I had this same discussion with the people at the last beading class I took. We all said we were more interested in learning a technique than actually having a finished object.

    I'd be warey of showing too many techniques as you will have people of different levels and learning types. I personally would not want to do any prep before a class.

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  4. I'm a item 2 person; I'm pretty good at following patterns and doing simple projects so if I'm going to take a class I want to learn whatever variety of awesome techniques the instructor is good at/known for/planning to share.

    Incidentally, an additional factor may be the skill level of your target audience? Very beginners- in that case item 1 would seem to be the way to go.

    Advanced beginners/intermediate (i.e. people who know how to, for example, rotary cut and sew a 1/4" seam, but are interested in a specific piecing technique or something), then item 3 might be the best.

    For people who have the basics under their belt and are really looking to expand their skills or who feel confident applying a technique learned from a sample to their particular project later on, an item 2 style class, where there are a bunch of different techniques to practice and learn would seem to be the way to go.

    Obviously people learn in lots of different ways and there are tons of variables, this is just my 2 cents!

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  5. Number two - I'm not fussed about coming away with a finished item, I'd be way more interested in techniques, or even stuff like "this is a faster way to do that" lol Three would be second choice, but I'd feel more under pressure then to get done... with option two there's no pressure.

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  6. Just to be difficult, I'd have to say it depends. For example, I attended a cushion making class. The whole point was to learn different ways for finishing a cushion (edging, zips, buttons, etc). I already knew I wanted to make patchwork cushions so I was much happier just learning techniques than having a cushion cover I'd then have to get rid of.
    If I were taking a class in something new, like learning embroidery or patchwork by machine (in a parallel world where I'd actually want to make them by machine, that is), I'd want a project that I get to pick my own materials for (given a guidance list), and that we start in class. Learning enough on the different bits that it can be finished at home.

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  7. I think I'm more of a 2 or 3 person, as well. Those options give the most room for individual touches and adaptation than 1 does. However, I agree that you'll likely have a wide variety of learners with different styles but whatever you decide, your class description will usually attract mostly those that are interested in that type of class.

    Good luck - i'm really excited for you!

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  8. I pick option #1 - if I'm going to learn a new technique, getting the project finished to take home is a good way to cement the skills - and it doesn't add to my UFO collection :)

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  9. I like to come away with something that is finished, but not necessarily a big item. So maybe a combination of 1 and 3!

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  10. I have just started going to a weekly lesson which takes two hours. They are run by a local lady who used to own a sewing and wool shop. She covers all crafts including quilting, bagmaking, needlecrafts, knitting and crochet. She also does day classes too which cover specific things. I went on one yesterday to make a zipped bag. The classes weekly ones came out of people not finishing projects and needing support. So we are all doing different projects at different stages and she is on hand to help with anything we need. IN the last 5 weeks I have made a quilt, whilst other people have made cushions, bags and cross stitches.

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  11. I'm with Nic, it depends on what it is and how many people are in the class. Sometimes it can take half an hour for a teacher to get around to you so you know your doing the right thing. 2-3 hours is not very long really. On the other hand I haven't done many work shops so i'm not an expert...

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  12. I don't mind doing the prep work beforehand in order to get more out of my time in class, so #3 is my favourite.

    I'm not a fan of practicing on samples that I'm unlikely to use afterwards, I'd rather have a real project, even if I have to finish it at home.

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  13. I think a complete project like purse and zip, could have some prep before.

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  14. Oooo interesting question ;) I think either 1 or 3. I'm not a big fan of coming home with samples.
    I'm quite enjoying your classroom diagram - it all looks very orderly!

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  15. Option 3 is my favourite. I like the idea of having something finished or at least well on the way to take home.

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  16. Intriguing!
    Definitely make and finish, and no prep!!

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  17. Umm I went to a 2 day class where we had to prep before hand. It took all of 2 days to work on the cushion front and I'm still nowhere near finished. It's been almost 2 years and it's sitting in the cupboard.
    I would rather learn techniques on samples. I don't need to have a finished item, but I would like to understand and finish the technique in the class, so probably 2 or 3 for me.

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  18. Happy to chat with you more about this on 2/3. Jxo

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  19. What Judith said but not when she said!

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  20. As an experienced quilter, I would totally be happy with having prep to do beforehand to help speed things up, but I do know that when I was first beginning I might have felt a little daunted by this. I would also enjoy learning more techniques over finishing my project in classes. i hope this helps! I'm intrigued now. :)

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  21. I think I'm a blend of one and three. I like having a finished project, but I'm cool with prep and getting mostly there...

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  22. Two or three definitely - probably more two though.

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  23. Currently, I would prefer three. I like the idea of not having to waste class-time on the easy stuff, so there is plenty of time to focus on the techniques I want to learn during class.

    A year ago, I would have preferred option one. I was doing some crazy things while prepping fabric and it would have been nice to have supervision :D! Plus, having something useful to take home is super motivating!

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  24. Hi Teacher when are you starting?
    For sure 3 for me. Learn as much as you can in the time.
    Hugs

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  25. Make and finish, a little prep is ok.

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  26. Not that this answers your question, but . . . I teach a monthly class, we do a different technique each time. No prep, not too much variation (some would spend an hour making a choice rather than making anything I once made the mistake in teaching three methods of stained glass appliqué, and getting them to choose, one lady made nothing as she couldn't choose. I learned more than she did!). They go far enough in the class to be able to continue, then usually either make it into something or make some other samples at home and bring them next month for show and tell.

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  27. I think it would be 2 or 3 for me - altho' coz I'm short of time at home it would be good to be nearly or completely finished before leaving! Juliex

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  28. I think I'd be a 2, I like to learn something new, but then I am capable of finishing it at home. I guess if I was less experienced then I might like 3 as I could prep at home and then finish with your help.

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  29. 2 or 3, depending on the class. 3 requires you to KNOW everyone is at a lever where they can be 'trusted' to do some prep accurately though, so probably a bit harder. I thought Lu and Kerry's classes at FQR last year was great - learned a completely new technque, and came away with a little block, but with plenty of scope for turning it into something/expanding it at a later date.

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  30. Two and three would be my choices depending on the projects.

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  31. I like options one and three. I like being able to walk away with something.

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  32. I'd prefer #1 if I were a newbie in the craft or technique, and #2 or #3 if I were more experienced. Also, I like #3 better than #2 just cause I like finishing things. I can't wait to hear what you're teaching!

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  33. I'm an option 3 girl, but only a short while ago I'd be a number 1. I think it depends on your skill level and sewing confidence. Can't wait to hear more about what you are thinking!

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  34. I think that this is a different answer depending on the skill level. 1 is good for everyone, it is nice to spend half a day and come away with a finish or almost finished item and it can be at any level. 2 is good for those who are ready to learn more than one technique but not great if some folks get stuck on the first technique, holding you up and confusing things on the next ones so it depends on your class. 3 is good as long as the pre-prep is no messed up. I personally would be very happy with this kind of class but I am not a beginner. 4. I am going to think on this, sometimes it is enough to start a complex project and not finish it but come away with a good understanding of the one technique so I guess that is my addition.

    You will have fun teaching classes I am sure.

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Thank you for stopping by, it's lovely to meet you :o)